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Fat City Mural

Location: 3123 N. Davidson Street side wall at Fat City Lofts

Artists: OBSOE, REBUS, ALOHA, JAFAR

Date: 2008

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @joeyobso, @bigtroublestudios


Story: On the side wall of Fat City Lofts condominium complex, four artists created a mural with connections to the former Fat City Deli. Look closely at the N. Davidson Street facade and you can see the historic storefront of the iconic neighborhood deli and music venue incorporated into the new building. The deli’s original side wall was covered in graffiti but was destroyed during a severe storm.


Key Formal Elements:

  • Heavy use of outline
  • Polychromatic color scheme

Make the Connection:

Fat City Lofts developers used a unique process to choose the artists for their project. Knowing that they wanted to honor the graffiti art heritage, they designed a ballot with images of graffiti examples by local artists. Voting took place during a NoDa gallery crawl night when they distributed the ballots. Rather than pick just one artist however, the developers settled on all and paid for their painting expenses. The artists branded themselves as #bigtroublecollective. 

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"Als Ich Khan: A Tribute to NoDa"

  

Location: 3205 N. Davidson Street on side wall of Jack Beagle’s

Artist: William Puckett

Date: 2010

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @mr_puckett


Story: One of the original NoDa art projects, William Puckett put out a call for volunteers to be included in this mural. 274 community members showed up and each one is included in the mural.  Puckett is one of the first mural artists to produce substantial work in Charlotte. He estimates his murals cover over 30,000 square feet of Charlotte walls. Puckett recently moved to Scotland to purse his doctorate.


Key Formal Elements:

  • Heavy use of outline around the figures
  • Little negative space meaning the area is almost entirely covered with figures

Make the Connection:

The title of this artwork, “Als Ich Chan: A Tribute to NoDa” is a nod to Puckett’s interest in art history. “Als Ich Chan” is from an inscription on a painting by Flemish Renaissance painter Jan Van Eyck. It translates to “As Best I Can.” Puckett received no commission for this work, working on it for 18 months before finishing. It covers roughly 1200 square feet. Wait. Is that a water tower?

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Mural

Location: 3215 N. Davidson Street front wall of Stu’s Barrell Shop

Artist

Date

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: 


Story:  Salvador Deli is the former business located in this building and the original commissioner of the mural. The name of the deli was a play on the name of famous Surrealist artist Salvador Dali. You can find the face of Dali, with his signature handlebar mustache, incorporated into each of the wine bottles on the upper part of the wall.


Key Formal Elements:

  • Symmetrical balance created by the placement of elephants
  • Warm colors of yellow, orange and red form the background

Make the Connection:

This mural is an appropriation of one of the more well-known Dali paintings. Dali challenges the usual view of elephants as symbols of strength and stability by giving them thin, spindly legs. This encourages the viewer to question our assumptions and enjoy the playful and illogical schemes of the Surrealist artists. 

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Fibonacci

Location: 3221 N. Davidson Street side wall of former Solstice Tavern

Artist: Jonay di Ragno

Date: 2017

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @jonaydiragno


Story: This mural is part of a collaboration between three artists and Brand the Moth, a local non-profit creating community-based public art projects.  Jonay di Ragno completed the mural on the far left of the side wall. Di Ragno describes himself as an Abstract Expressionist artist and was raised in both Spain and the Caribbean.  Fibonacci refers to the Fibonacci Sequence, a mathematical series of numbers.  The numbers are often expressed in nature and are seen to have divine or perfect meanings.

   

Key Formal Elements:

  • Focal point in the center of the spiral
  • Loose, expressive splashes of warm and cool colors

Make the Connection:

Di Ragno uses the familiar form of the spiral. The spiral is one of the oldest known symbols in art and is often associated with suggestions of life, death, the rising and setting of the sun, and creation. Here the loose bands of the spiral draw you into the center to suggest an energy source and connect to the name of the former Solstice Tavern.  This is the most instagrammed mural in Charlotte.  Take your picture and post it!

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Mural

Location: 3221 N. Davidson Street corner of former Solstice Tavern

Artist: Georgie Nakima

Date: 2017

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @gardenofjourney


Story: This mural is part of a collaboration between three artists and Brand the Moth, a local non-profit creating community-based public art projects. Georgie Nakima completed the mural at the corner of the building. Nakima’s background in math and the sciences is often expressed in her work through the use of geometry, patterns and nature. 


Key Formal Elements:

  • Geometric patterns evoke African art
  • Saturated use of warm colors of the sun creates focal point of the goddess  


Make the Connection:

Nakima has the toughest task of the three artists in this collaboration with the job of connecting the other two around the corner of the building. She connects to the side wall painting through the use of some circular patterns but opts for a strong and dominant goddess figure at the corner to balance the equally strong profile to the right of the door by Napoletano. What similarities can you find that connect or unify all three of these separate paintings? 

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Mural

Location: 3221 N. Davidson Street front wall of former Solstice Tavern

Artist: Nick Napoletano 

Date: 2017

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @napoletanoart


Story: This mural is part of a collaboration between three artists and Brand the Moth, a local non-profit creating community-based public art projects. Nick Napoletano completed the mural on the front facade facing N. Davidson Street. Classically trained and educated both in the United States and Italy, Napoletano works in Charlotte and other cities all over the country. 


Key Formal Elements:

  • Complementary colors of yellow and violet produce a dramatic effect
  • Symmetry is provided with the orange sun at the left and the yellow sun at the right thus linking Nakima’s and Napoletano’s work

Make the Connection:

This painting is an exploration of contrasts. The stability and anchor of the stationary portrait of the young woman is contrasted with the free-flowing movement of the bluish, purple ribbons. Perhaps that is a metaphor for the neighborhood. Look closely at the ribbons. Small, outlined symbols are scattered in the ribbons. Their designs came from a social media call put out by the artist. Napoletano’s interest in “Augmented Reality,” or AR is evolving and eventually these murals will move. 

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Mural

Location: 453 E. 35th Street side wall of The Blind Pig

Artist: Rosalia Torres-Weiner, with David Merck

Date: 2014

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @redcalacastudio


Story: Artist and activist Rosalia Torres-Weiner is a native of Mexico. Commissioned by The Blind Pig, a popular NoDa bar, this mural juxtaposes episodes from NoDa history with images of its new emergence as an arts area.  


Key Formal Elements:

  • The large scale of the white spindle of cotton and the artist’s hand and paint brush balance each side of the painting
  • Note the one-point linear perspective of the streetscape

Make the Connection:

On the left side of the mural, Torres-Weiner draws upon Charlotte’s textile manufacturing history. In the early 20th century, North Charlotte became Charlotte’s largest mill village. Highland Park Manufacturing Company Plant No. 3, just down the road, housed 30,000 spindles and employed over 800 laborers. Torres-Weiner skillfully draws attention to the oppressive working conditions in the mill with the bent-over woman laborer surrounded and engulfed by white cotton spindles. Is the artist making a statement connecting mill history and the emergence of the New South skyline above it? Oh, and yep, it is another water tower.

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Mural

Location: 3307 N. Davidson Street mural in front of Dog Bar

Artist: Terry Hanney

Date: 2016

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: Facebook Terry Hanney and Dog Bar Dog Mural


Story: Neighborhood dogs are painted on this 60-foot fence enclosing the Dog Bar. The artist invited dog owners to bring their special loved ones for a sitting to be included in the mural.


Key Formal Elements: 

  • Representational details are included in each portrait
  • Grid of the fence provides a natural way to organize the panels

Make the Connection:

Puppies. After the heavy look at the importance of women laborers in the creation of our New South city, it is nice to look at puppies. 

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Meta

Location: 424 E. 36th Street entrance

Artist: Ruth Ava Lyons

Date: 1995

Media: Glass tesserae and concrete

Artist Info: @ruthavalyonsart


Story:  Ruth Ava Lyons and partner Paul Sires are artist legends in Charlotte. The artists found studio space in the NoDa area in the early 1980s, invested in properties and artists, and started the artistic renaissance of the neighborhood. Their gallery was called Center of the Earth Gallery and was located on N. Davidson Street. Lyons created her mosaic piece in 1995 but it recently found a new home in a permanent location in NoDa. 


Key Formal Elements:

  • Radial balance
  • Cool colors in the background

Make the Connection:

Lyons works in the mosaic method which involves placing individual, small, squares of glass in concrete to create an image. The individual pieces of glass are referred to as tesserae. Lyons includes a butterfly as the central image as a sign of transformation and connection to the NoDa renaissance. She encircles the butterfly with symbols of the area’s past as a textile mill village. What symbols can you find? A textile mill? A spindle? Cotton? 

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Confetti Stripes Mural

Location: 424 E. 36th Street next to Jeni's Ice Cream

Artist: Evelyn Henson

Date: 2019

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @evelyn_henson


Story: Charlotte artist Evelyn Henson captured our hearts with her “painting happy art to brighten your day” recent South End project. Now we are seeing stripes in NoDa! Henson started painting 6 years ago and this mural marks her second public art project. I’d say she’s found success at this mural thing. 


Key Formal Elements:

  • Repetition
  • Polychromatic color scheme

Make the Connection:

Instagram walls. Who knew we needed them. Henson makes the transition from her brightly colored more intimate scaled art to work on a public mural and enter the popularity of Instagrammable walls. This spot may eventually rival the “Fibonacci Mural” in NoDa as Charlotte’s most popular Instagram mural. Which is your favorite? Make sure you use the tag #confettistripeswall and #artwalksclt if you take a selfie. 

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Mural

Location: 424 E. 36th Street Parking Deck Panels

Artist: Holly Keogh in collaboration with Goodyear Arts

Date: 2017

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @hckeogh, @goodyeararts


Story: Developer Crescent Communities commissioned artist Holly Keogh to cover the side of the parking deck located at the NoDa light rail station and the NOVEL Noda Apartments. The parking deck provides much needed parking for the mixed-use development as well as public parking for the neighborhood. Keogh created the design and worked with artists from Goodyear Arts, a local non-profit providing artist residencies, to implement the mural. 


Key Formal Elements:

  • Scale – this is a massive mural measuring almost 280 feet wide and 60 feet tall
  • Highly saturated and flat colors provide a playful feeling

Make the Connection:

In this design, Keogh considers a familiar, yet nostalgic image of two people talking on the phone as a way to suggest connection. The artist suggests both the newly found literal connection provided by the long-awaited light rail line and the connection provided by a new community. The iconic NoDa water tower is included. Can you remember how many times artists have used the water tower in their work in NoDa? 

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Mural

Location: 424 E. 36th Street loading dock mural at Novel NoDa Apartments

Artists: Matt Hooker, Matt Moore

Date: 2017

Media: Acrylic paint

Artist Info: @hookermedia, @puckmcgruff


Story: Matt Hooker and Matt Moore are some of the more prolific mural artists working in Charlotte. They bring diverse styles to each project. Here the artists cover loading dock doors with a hyper-realist portrait of a real woman @amandataylor80 and a writing quill.  The mural was commissioned by @liveNOVELnoda.


Key Formal Elements:

  • Face is entirely modeled using gray scale tones
  • Notice the areas of highlights on her tip of her nose and her lips.

Make the Connection:

Look closely at the face of the woman. The shadows of the face are created using delicate cursive writing. In the painting of the writing quill, notice the same technique in the band of red.  In descriptions of the work, the artists use the hashtag “#writeyourownstory.  How does this hashtag help the viewer connect with potential meanings of this piece? Now can you connect that to a sense of place in NoDa? 

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Sculpture

Location: Sculptural Screen

Artist: 

Date: 

Media: Metal

Artist Info: 


Story


Key Formal Elements:

  • Variety rules this composition
  • Texture is provided with different metals and shapes

Make the Connection:

The artist incorporates a variety of tools, blades, pipes, rebar, chains, and sheets of metal to visually connect the viewer to the industrial history of NoDa. With the textile mills and machinery parts being reused in the area’s renaissance, the neighborhood’s industrial history lives again. This time it is a simple, functional screen to hide vehicles in a parking lot.